Room for Improvement

The fear of failure often does more damage than failure itself.

A couple weeks ago, I decided to share my post regarding potential on Facebook. After doing so, my buddy Derik reached out to let me know what he thought of the post and to let me know there was a typo… in the first sentence. He even took a screenshot of it to help me out. First, I am very thankful to have friends that are willing to read what I am writing, reach out, and provide constructive criticism to help me improve. Admittedly, I was disappointed in the mistake and immediately went to the post to fix it. However, because it was in the first sentence, it showed up right below the title of the post as it was shared on Facebook (it’s still there, see for yourself). This experience was both humbling and encouraging.

Humbling: It served as a reminder that I have a lot of work to do on my writing and editing abilities.

Encouraging: It was a reminder that I have a lot of room for improvement and growth in my writing and editing abilities.

The ideas sound the same and they are definitely connected. At the heart of it is this: my writing journey is a process. And as such, I am going to make mistakes and fail as I continue to write (and I will continue to write). This mistake would not have been made, and I would not have faced the disappointment and embarrassment had I decided not to post anything. Same thing can be said about a basketball player missing a shot. They won’t face the disappointment of missing the shot if they decide not to shoot. However, they know three things. One, in order to score, they have to shoot and be willing to risk missing.  Two, missing is part of the game. Three, the way to become a better basketball player is to go to the court and start dribbling and shooting.

A quick aside: there is definitely value in watching game film- learning strategy, best practices, and what you can do better. But that means nothing if you never try and implement what you are learning by stepping on the court and practicing (dribbling and shooting). In that same line, I can read as many books and watch as many videos on writing and editing as I want. But I will not become a better writer if I do not actually write.

Here’s the point: life is all about perspective and choices. You can choose to view each grammatical error or mistake in life as a failure and beat yourself up over it. Or, you can recognize that mistakes are part of the process, learn from them, and implement what you learned in order to improve.

I hope you choose to pursue your potential and whatever you are passionate about, understanding that mistakes (and failure) are part of the process. Make it a great life, or not. The choice is yours.

-David A. Brown-Dawson, 17 June 2017

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